Maternity Physio

Mums who run- how to make it leak-free

Going for a run is a quick and convenient way to grab some fresh air and head space. But going for a run after having a baby might not be as straightforward as it was before you became pregnant. Why? Well, growing a baby inside of you stretches the muscles and soft tissue that hold your pelvic organs up and inside your pelvis. Then throw in the usual stretchy hormones associated with pregnancy and breastfeeding into that…

Vaginal Exercisers!

Well that got your attention. Let talk about postnatal vaginas for a minute. There is always a lot of emphasis on postnatal tummies-that’s the bit you can see, but not so much on the mysterious undercarriage. But the fact is your vagina and its associated pelvic floor is your foundation-and everyone knows with any good build- the foundations need to be strong before any work goes on with the walls, right? Plus postnatal vaginas can have issues which are easy…

POP! – Pelvic Organ Prolapse

POP is short for Pelvic Organ Prolapse. Pop happens when the one or more of the organs inside your pelvis (bladder/bowel/uterus) fall or protrude into the vaginal canal. 50% of women will have some degree of POP after childbirth. Eek! I’m here to shed some light on it and spread the POP word. Pregnancy and childbirth can cause a weakened pelvic floor and stretched connective tissue down there, meaning it`s not supporting these organs and holding them…

4 things which can lead to pelvic girdle pain

4 things which can lead to pelvic girdle pain

1. Weak Pelvic Muscles Sometimes muscle weakness can lead to pelvic instability or imbalance. The muscles responsible for “holding your pelvis together”and keeping it stable can let you down. This can be the gluteal muscles which hold things together at the back and sides of your pelvis. Stable inner thigh muscles also help keep the pubic joint at the front of your pelvis level. Your pelvic floor muscles provide the foundations and need to be strong…

Mummy MOT pre-screen questionnaire

If you are attending a Mummy MOT, then please click on the link below to open the Mummy MOT pre-screen questionnaire. Enable editing and when complete, email it to info@maternityphysio.co.uk This gives your Practitioner all of the relevant info needed and makes the MOT more efficient and bespoke to your postnatal needs. Many Thanks MOT Pre-screen Questionnaire  

Ive just had a baby! -5 ways to cope

1) Rest Sleep is the best healer of all and you need recovery time. And with a constant feeding frenzy you have got to grab it while you can. It`s normal for baby to feed pretty constantly in those early days especially when breastfeeding. It feels crazy and relentless but it won`t always be like that and this early milk fest is setting down some good foundations for the future. So lie down and rest…

I have had the baby, now when can I run??

T It’s such a quick and convenient type of exercise. Just lace up the trainers and go, grab some fresh air and well-earned head space. But how do you know your body is ready for this after having a baby? The NHS postnatal exercise advice says “It is usually a good idea to wait until after your 6 week postnatal check before you start any high impact exercise such as aerobics or running” What is…

Diastasis- Do I have one ? and how to heal it

Diastasis- Do I have one ? and how to heal it

 What is a Diastasis? Diastasis is a stretch in the connective tissue running down the middle of your tummy. This connective tissue joins the rectus (“six-pack muscle”) in the centre. This stretch in the tissue is quite normal during pregnancy but in some women it doesn’t resolve afterwards. The tissue remains stretched and leaves a gap between the rectus muscle. If the gap is more than 2 fingers wide it is termed a diastasis. So…

Post Natal Exercises- The Early Days

Pelvic Floor Strengthening In any position but you may like to lie on your back with knees bent at first. Practice trying to isolate this muscle. Inhale, exhale as you gently zip up and lift your pelvic floor (from back to front) and relax on the inhale. Repeat for 12 reps. Rest 1-2 mins, then try another set or until fatigue.  It important to allow the pelvic floor to fully relax in between contractions and at…